Engaging the culture with the gospel of Jesus Christ.

A Bone Crushing Pointer to Redemption:

I picked up “BoneMan’s Daughters” because I had heard that Ted Dekker is a great story teller and can weave a tale that the reader can feel living in his bones. It has been sometime since I have read a novel so I thought I’d give it a shot to see if the claims could be substantiated. I must say they most definitely were!

But the thing that got me most was how much within his work I saw a hint of the love with which God The Father has pursued His beloved. Although I am a father myself (sons, no daughters) it was not my fatherhood that connected me with the story. It was his massive theme of redemption that drew me deeper and deeper in. He’s a great novelist because he can tell a story to mirror truth rather than just a good moral lesson.

I know that if I explain how Ryan Evens (the rejected father) attempted the redemption of his daughter from the grip of a self-proclaimed incarnation of Satan named Alvin Finch, I run the risk of spoiling the bulk of the story. I do not wish to do that to any reader, nor the author.

I will say this – you will vilify those Ted wishes you to hate and you will resound with compassion for those whom he wishes you to do so. You will probably even see yourself in the very characters he has taught you to despise. And then, after seeing your own shortcoming in the sins of those apparently in the wrong, he drives home with a sledge hammer the nail that unites his tale to the real story that he has been shadowing from a far. In my estimation, “BoneMan’s Daughters” is an example of how a novelist does kingdom work through his field – by telling a story that effectively points to The Story.

Read it, and let me know what you think.

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